Inner Life

Juliet Thompson was painting the Master’s portrait in America. Lua Getsinger and May Maxwell came into the library, crossed over to where she was sitting and stood behind her. The Master looked up and smiled at May. ‘You have a kind heart, Mrs. Maxwell.’ Then he turned to Lua. You, Lua, have a tender heart. And what kind of heart have you, Juliet?’ He laughed. ‘What kind of heart have you?‘
‘Oh, what kind of heart have I? You know, my Lord. I don’t know.’ ‘An emotional heart.’ He laughed again and rolled His hands one round the other in a sort of tempestuous gesture. ‘You will have a boiling heart, Juliet. Now,’ He continued, ‘if these three hearts were united into one heart—kind, tender and emotional—what a great heart that would be!’ (Honnold, Annamarie, Vignettes from the Life of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, p. 46)


Juliet Thompson has given us a sweet picture of the Master in ‘Akka: ‘He had sent for us that afternoon to meet Mr. Sprague and the Persian believers and, not being ready, I put on a dress I could slip into easily. As I passed the Master standing in His door: ‘I am afraid I am not dressed well enough,’ I said. He touched my arm, smiling with the utmost sweetness. ‘The Persian believers do not look at the dress, My child. They look at the heart.’
(Honnold, Annamarie, Vignettes from the Life of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, p. 61)